Archive for February, 2018

The Asian Vegetable Garden



(4/19/03) Host Steve Owens takes viewers through studio’s Asian Vegetable Garden.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - February 4, 2018 at 1:04 pm

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How Traditional Chinese Health Beliefs and Chinese Culture Influence Health and Illness?

Traditional Chinese health beliefs adopt a holistic view emphasizing the importance of environmental factors in increasing risk of disease. According to Quah (1985), these factors influence the balance of body’s harmony, yin and yang. These are two opposite but complementary forces and, together with qi (vital energy), they control the universe and explain the relationship between people and their surroundings. Imbalance in these two forces, or in the qi, results in illness.

In order to restore the balance, traditional remedial practices may be needed. For example, excess `hot’ energy can be counterbalanced by cooling herbal teas, and vice versa. These beliefs are deeply ingrained among the Chinese, and have been found to be unchanged following migration to Singapore.

Lee, et. al. (2004), found that patients with specific chronic diseases, namely arthritis, musculoskeletal diseases and stroke, were more likely to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). This was strongly determined by the ‘chronic disease triad’, perceived satisfaction with care and cultural health beliefs.

Hence the use of TCM is not associated with the quality of doctor-patient interaction. Astin (1998) also agreed that it was seen as being more compatible with the patients’ values, spiritual and religious philosophy, or beliefs regarding the nature and meaning of health and illness.

In traditional Chinese culture, taking medication is thought to be aversive, hence medications tend to be taken only until symptoms are relieved and then discontinued; if symptoms are not obvious, medications will probably never be taken.

Apart from parental cultural beliefs, minor side effects of certain antibiotics such as stomach upset may contribute to the poor adherence of medication. The use of “leftover”, “shared” antibiotics and over-the-counter purchase of antibiotics by parents are common situations in the community.

They think that their children suffer from the same illnesses judging by the similar symptoms, so they would give the “leftover” or “shared” antibiotics to their children and only bring them to their doctors if there is no improvement (Chang & Tang, 2006). This may cause their conditions to deteriorate and may necessitate aggressive treatments later which may have unnecessary side effects.

However, there are small groups of Chinese who also blamed ill-health or misfortunes on supernatural forces, or on divine retribution, or on the malevolence of a ‘witch’ or ‘sorcerer’ (Helman, 1994). Such groups will usually seek cures from their religions.

In Singapore, the Ministry of Health has drawn up the TCM Practitioners’ Ethical Code and Ethical Guidelines to prevent any unscrupulous practitioners from preying on their patients and taking advantage of their beliefs, for example, molesting ignorant patients.

The degree of acculturation has been evidenced in the following case. An old man was brought into our hospital with a week-long history of malaise, nausea and vomiting, and sudden jaundice. He was diagnosed to have an obstructive mass in the liver.

A biopsy revealed hepatocellular carcinoma. The serological test suggested chronic active hepatitis B. When the news broke to his son that his father had cancer, he requested not to disclose that to his father.

When we discussed end of life issues such as hospice care and “do-not-resuscitate” (DNR) orders, the son tried to divert the discussion to other issues such as when his father could go home.

Cultural Issues that may be involved in this case are:

The Chinese tend to protect the elderly from bad news.

Believing in karma – the older folk believe that discussing illnesses or death/dying is bad luck. They think that talking about something bad will cause it to come true.

There is an increased incidence of liver cancer resulting from Hepatitis B due to delayed treatment in the elderly, as it may take a long time for them to accept the initial diagnosis.

Reference:

Astin JA. (1998). Why patients use alternative medicine. J Am Med Assoc 1998; 279: 1548-1553.

Chan, G. C. & Tang, S. F. (2006) Parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for acute upper respiratory tract infection in children attending a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. Singapore Medical Journal, 47(4):266

Helman, C. G. (1990) Culture, Health and Illness. Wright, London.

Quah, S. R. (1985) The Health Belief Model and preventive health behaviour in Singapore. Social Science and Medicine, 21, 351-363.

Lee GBW, Charn TC, Chew ZH and Ng TP. (2004). Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with chronic diseases in primary care is associated with perceived quality of care and cultural beliefs. Family Practice, 21(6): 654-660.



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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 1:28 am

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EXOTIC FOODS WITH AUSTIN EVANS



Austin needs your thumbs like he’s never needed thumbs before…

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39 comments - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 1:00 am

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STOCKHOLM SNOW CHAOS IMPRESSIONS



The first real snow hit Stockholm hard. I wander/slide around the city also and give my first political rant.

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SNOW, VLog, vlogging, Snow chaos, snow chaos in Stockholm, Snökaos, Snö i Stockholm, First snow, Trump, Political Rant, What do foreigners think about trump, Stockholm, Sweden, Schweden, Sverige, GoPro, Stockholm snö 2014, stockholm snö 2016, Stockholm snow November, Stockholm snow December, Stockholm Snow January, Snö i Stockholm 2016, Stockholm weather snow, Stockholm Snow in winter, Europe, winter, Epic, snökaos, stockholm snow record, Sweden snow record, snow record broken,

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6 comments - What do you think?  Posted by admin - February 3, 2018 at 12:57 pm

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About Asian Food and Cooking

Asian cooking can generally be classified into several categories on the basis of the regional styles of cooking and the people and culture of those regions. Some of the main categories of Asian food are East Asian, Southeast Asian, South Asian, Central Asian and Middle Eastern. In common usage however, Asian food (also referred to as Asian cuisine) primarily includes South and Southeast Asian cuisine. The main countries that constitute this region are India, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma etc.

Chinese food is generally considered to be East Asian food, even though China stretches from across mid-Asia to the Far East. Rice is the most important staple through most of China. In some regions however, noodles are preferred to rice. Most foods are prepared by mincing or cooking, and are cooked in a wok, using very little oil. Traditionally, there are eight main regional cuisines in China: Anhui, Cantonese, Fujian, Hunan, Jiangsu, Shandong, Sichuan and Zhejiang. The three distinct regional cuisines however, are Shanghainese – characterized by hot and spicy chilly pepper flavoring, Cantonese – associated with flavorful meat and vegetable combinations, and Mandarin – associated with steamed noodle and bread dumplings.

Since Japan is an island nation, much of its food includes fish and fish-based ingredients. Rice and sliced, salted vegetables are staples in Japanese cooking. Soy products such as soya sauce, soya paste and tofu are also used in many Japanese preparations. Japanese cuisine also includes sushi, meats in teriyaki sauce, lightly battered and fried meat and fish, as well as shellfish called tempura. Japanese food is healthy, tasty and simple to cook. It is low-fat, low-cholesterol, and well-known for reducing heart-related diseases.

While different parts of India are known for their different cultural backgrounds, they are also known for their different flavors and cuisines. Vegetarian food includes khakra and dhokla from Gujarat, daal-baati-choorma from Rajasthan, the Kashmiri dum-aloo, as well as dosas and kesari bhaat from South India. Non-vegetarian delicacies, especially the tandoori kind, were especially devised for the Nawabs of India. The saffron-flavoured reshmi kebab, and the lime juice and garlic marinated fish tikka serve as delectable appetizers in combination with the yogurt-marinated chicken sheek kebab. Tandoori food is the perfect evidence of the richness of India’s cultural diversity and royalty.

Asian recipes were casually shared among the womenfolk in Asia, who generally got together after a long day’s work, to discuss the day’s events. Many of these recipes were guarded as important family secrets and carefully passed down from one generation to another. Thai food is a blend of Chinese, Malay, Indian, Myanmar, Khmer, Laotian and to a lesser extent, Portuguese cuisines. It is a harmonious blend of indigenous spices. Malaysian cuisine consists of fish, seafood, vegetables and poultry, though beef is conspicuously absent. It is usually spicier than Chinese food. Indonesian cuisine is also known for its unique blend of sweet and sour spiciness. Asian cooking has enormous potential in modern times, as Asian food chains are springing up all over the world very rapidly, and are also enjoying immense popularity.



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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 1:27 am

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The Bridge Hold



This video shows how to cut safely. It has been produced for use in primary schools throughout the UK. Other videos and support materials can be found at www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

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The Food Porn Superstars of South Korea: Mukbang



In Korea, people can tune in on their laptops and cell phones any time, any day and watch people eat—and talk about eating. These “online eaters” are neither chefs nor restaurateurs, but the stars of the South Korean digital food phenomenon: Mukbang.

Charlet Duboc travels to Seoul to meet some full-time stars and fans of a phenomenon that is attracting millions of viewers within this East Asian republic and forging a new kind of online celebrity.

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30 comments - What do you think?  Posted by admin - February 2, 2018 at 12:55 pm

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Becoming a Food Vendor – 3 Steps to Success As a Food Vendor

Becoming a food vendor may be one of the most interesting things you could ever do in your life. The reason being is, if you are a people person like me, becoming a food vendor allows for you to be constantly outside around with people and best of all, you can observe and watch the everyday life behavior of the general public! In addition to those positive points, by becoming a food vendor you can also earn up to $ 1000 a day. This is no joke.

So picture this again, enjoying yourself by being surrounded by people as well as being given the opportunity to observe people (aka people watch, not in the stalker-like form!)) And the bonus of it all, you could earn a potential income of up to $ 1000 dollars per day! Now who would not want that kind of job? Becoming a food vendor can be very rewarding.

Here are 3 simple secrets to becoming a food vendor and beating your competition soundly!

  • For one, repeat customers will mostly revolve around the quality and taste of your food products. Spend some time fine-tuning your recipes. Customers remember bad experiences, and there is usually lots of competition they can choose instead.
  • Find a location that has little or no competition at all. Examples of this could be by the park, by a school or office, or even at a construction site where there is bound to be a number of hungry people so increasing your selling potential!
  • You have to also be smart when becoming a food vendor as you have to observe your demographics and sell your food products accordingly. For example, if your neighborhood has a higher number of Muslims and Jews, it would not be wise to sell pork hot dogs or non-kosher food products! You have to be aware of your surroundings to make the best out of your food vendor experience!



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The Best Food in the World, Vietnam



Ho Chi Mihn City vlog! Thanks for watching.
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Special thanks to this amazing company for giving me a food tour! Check them out if you ever go to Ho Chi Mihn!

Songs from No Copyright Sounds, Machinarium soundtrack and
“All Our Love” by Bordeaux

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Primitive Technology: Termite clay kiln & pottery



I built this pottery kiln and some pottery from termite mound clay to test an alternative clay source to my usual one from the creek bank. I started by making a large grate from ordinary clay. It was just under 50 cm in diameter. Next, I took dry chunks of termite nest and put them into the pit in front of the tiled roof hut. The chunks were crushed and water was added to slake the clay. The clay was trodden on to mix it. Dead palm fronds were added to the clay to stop it from cracking as it dried and to add insulation to the kiln. The mixture was trodden on again and then taken from the pit. A trench was dug to form the firebox of the kiln and a wall of clay was made in the front of the trench. A hole was dug into the wall to allow air flow into the firebox.
The grate was placed on top of the firebox and the walls of the ware chamber were built around the grate. When the kiln walls were finished, grate bars made from termite clay were placed into the firebox. Grate bars are important for fireboxes as they lift the firewood off the ground allowing air to move up through the fuel bed for more efficient combustion. Burning wood as a heap on the ground allows cold air to flow up and over the coals, cooling the kiln and leaving the air unreacted with the fire wood. It still works but is much less efficient than using grate bars. The finished kiln was 50 cm tall (above grate height), 50 cm in diameter and with walls about 12.5 cm thick. The pit/firebox was about 25 cm deep and 25 cm wide with grate bars sitting half way between the ground and the circular kiln grate above.
Next, for the pottery clay, I selected a termite mound built on red clay soil. I took it to the kiln area and slaked it with water and mixed it in a small pit. I crushed up an old grate from a previous kiln and mixed it into the termite clay as grog. Grog prevents pottery from cracking as it dries and helps prevent breakage when firing. I then shaped the clay into a small urn. I also made some barrel roof tiles and a smaller pot from termite clay. I then stacked the kiln with the termite pottery.
To fire the pottery, I collected a large pile of dead wood and started a fire in the firebox. I heard some explosions in the kiln early on and knew something broke but continued anyway. Within an hour the kiln had heated up well and the pottery was glowing red hot. By the second hour the temperature went down illustrating an important point: if you over fill the firebox with wood the kiln will choke it and not burn efficiently. Realising this mistake I merely let the wood burn down a little so more air could get through. By 2 hours and 30 minutes the kiln was firing nicely again with all the pottery glowing low orange (about 845 c or 1550 f). I kept it at this low firing temperature for another 30 minutes. The whole firing process took about 3 hours from start to finish, a relatively short period of time for firing pottery.
When I took the pottery out, one tile had broken and the urn had spalled (a piece of the outer pot broke off) possibly due to still having moisture in it. The urn was still useable though and I use it to water the cassava patch. The forge blower was well fired and is now immune to water damage, no longer needing to be carefully protected from the rain. I put it in the barrel tile shed for storage. I put the broken tile and spalled piece from the urn in a special heap of broken pottery. When I make pottery in future I can crush up these broken pots and mix it into the new clay as grog to strengthen the new ceramic items. Finally, I stored the good tiles at the barrel tiled hut as replacements for broken tiles in that structure should there be any damage in future.
Termite clay is good material for making furnaces and an OK substitute for good pottery clay should it be difficult to find a better source. The termites have already processed the clay by the fact that their mouths are too small to include sticks and pebbles into their structures. As a result, the clay is very smooth and plastic. Too smooth for my liking, in fact, I’m used to working with coarser clay that has silt mixed into it naturally. I find that termite clay is either too runny when wet or cracks too easily when drier. It was difficult to form into complex shapes and it took me 2 attempts to make the urn. But for forming objects like tiles it’s OK, it can be pressed into shape and it will hold without difficulty. In future, I’d be likely to use termite clay for mass producing formed objects such as bricks, tiles, simple pots (formed over a mould) and possibly pipes, thereby conserving the dwindling clay supply from the creek bank which I’ll save for more intricate pottery. In summary, termite clay is able to be used to produce basic pottery if no other source can be found. If you have a termite nest you can make basic pottery from it.

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31 comments - What do you think?  Posted by admin - February 1, 2018 at 12:51 pm

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