Over 30 Edible Perennials in a Small Garden!



In today’s video, I show you the more than 30 edible perennials growing in our small garden!

If you shop on Amazon, you can support OYR simply by clicking this link (bookmark it too) before shopping:

0:48 Blackberries
1:02 King Stropharia (Wine Cap) Mushrooms
1:17 Heritage Raspberry
1:30 Pixwell Gooseberry
1:52 Honey Berry (Haskap)
2:05 Apple Mint
2:05 Dandelion
2:05 Lemon Balm
2:34 Asian Pear
2:49 Redhaven Peach
3:04 Lovage
3:15 French Sorrel
3:51 Good King Henry
4:13 Sea Kale
4:33 Sylvetta Arugula
4:59 Red Veined Sorrel
5:20 Garlic Chives
5:37 Egyptian Walking Onions
6:00 Sunchokes
7:22 Blueberries
7:41 Tristar Strawberries
7:47 June Strawberries
7:54 Tree Collards
8:22 Elan Strawberries
8:34 Grapes
8:34 Black Raspberries
8:34 Yellow Raspberries
9:00 Catnip
9:12 Oregano
9:19 Chives
9:25 Hyssop
9:29 Yellow Sage
9:37 Purple Passion Asparagus

A Global Inventory of Perennial Vegetables:

I’m passionate about an approach to organic gardening that is frugal, easy, sustainable, and works with nature to achieve amazing results. My videos will help you grow more healthy organic fruits and vegetables, while working less and saving money. I don’t push gardening products. I don’t hype bogus “garden secrets”. I provide evidence based strategies to help you grow a lot of food on a little land without spending much or working harder than you have to!

source

25 thoughts on “Over 30 Edible Perennials in a Small Garden!”

  1. Time codes for perennials:

    0:48 Blackberries
    1:02 King Stropharia (Wine Cap) Mushrooms
    1:17 Heritage Raspberry
    1:30 Pixwell Gooseberry
    1:52 Honey Berry (Haskap)
    2:05 Apple Mint
    2:05 Dandelion
    2:05 Lemon Balm
    2:34 Asian Pear
    2:49 Redhaven Peach
    3:04 Lovage
    3:15 French Sorrel
    3:51 Good King Henry
    4:13 Sea Kale
    4:33 Sylvetta Arugula
    4:59 Red Veined Sorrel
    5:20 Garlic Chives
    5:37 Egyptian Walking Onions
    6:00 Sunchokes
    7:22 Blueberries
    7:41 Tristar Strawberries
    7:47 June Strawberries
    7:54 Tree Collards
    8:22 Elan Strawberries
    8:34 Grapes
    8:34 Black Raspberries
    8:34 Yellow Raspberries
    9:00 Catnip
    9:12 Oregano
    9:19 Chives
    9:25 Hyssop
    9:29 Yellow Sage
    9:37 Purple Passion Asparagus

    A Global Inventory of Perennial Vegetables: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9ew4_svq9K3N3puYWNuSF9MdlE

  2. We just moved and I have to start over with gardening. Love you channel and you have really amazing ideas. I will be getting my greenhouse again soon. Being zone 5 all the same plants will work!!

  3. Honestly a video on how to use and what parts are edible and storage techniques, like what gets dried and what parts of each plant get eaten would be great addition! Thanks ! Oh I subbed and liked! Awesome idea’s. My friends grandfather was a old farmer and his veggie stew had stuff you could not find in a grocery store and tasted fantastic! I grew up with four 6 foot blue berry bushes in our backyard and we would have tons of blueberries every year as well as grapes.

  4. Hi Patrick, for a few years now I've really enjoyed your content and the relaxed delivery of the advice and guidance you share. Thank you.

    Re the Tree Collard's perennial credentials in zone 5, living as I do in the UK (zone 8: wet, mainly cold and overcast etc) I was skeptical I could grow them as a perennial and found no online sources of anybody who had tried. However, I found a perennial Kale called "Taunton
    Dean" which looks remarkably similar to the Tree Collard with resembling charactoristics such as turning purple in colder weather and growing tall like a tree or bushy dependant on how they are trained.

    Like the Tree Collard the Taunton Dean also grows via cuttings. I've read that they produce for over 5 years and some produce for 8+ years.

    I've had my plants for 2 years now and they've recently survived temperatures of -8 without any protection. I'm taking cuttings later this year and was wondering if you would like some?

  5. our first home, purchased from an elderly widower, was in zone 5B. Had incredible variety of plantings throughout the property. Even the garlic chives (neglected for 15 years since the wife part of the marriage had passed) still thrived. Literally every plant was left alone, except for a neighbour cutting the grass!! Unfortunately, the golden plum (nectarine?) was infested by woodworms the first winter we were there. And we had NO idea how to treat the poor tree to save it.
    There were also 4 dwarf apple trees and two dwarf pears that needed radical surgery and regular pruning to get back into shape and bear worthy fruit. Found that 2 of the apple trees had had some additional growth cloned on, they each bore 4 different varieties of apples! Pears, not sure what kind they were, except green and stayed fairly hard right up until first snowfall, yet although hard, were sweet enough that they did attract more than their fare share of wasps.

  6. Hello. Thanks for creating this informational and inspiring video! Regarding the Wine Cap mushrooms: Isn't there a chance for cross-contamination from any other fungus varieties? (This is showing my ignorance about mushrooms).

  7. The honeyberries took 4 years to produce a crop?
    I'm afraid I don't have time to wait for tree fruits…I'm almost 65, I need items I can get a crop from this season!

  8. What a lovely garden! Oscar is a show stopper! I was wondering how your garden is oriented-north ,South, east, west. In particular where are your fruit trees placed. I was thinking of planting fig and plum on the southwest and west side of the raised beds to help create some afternoon relief from the sun. I took fig and yellow plum cuttings early winter and they are doing marvelously well. My Polish friend gave me a huge pile of lavage to dry and use. I had never heard of it before. I love it! It is the tastiest herb! I will grow it from now on! Very interested to see how you transition into a "food forest". Happy gardening!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.